Digital History as Public History

The school year is drawing to a close, and as I look back on the semester, I can see many connections between Digital History and a course that I took last semester, Public History. During my public history class, we read the book Recent Themes on Historians and the Public in our exploration of the … Continue reading Digital History as Public History

The Eighth Ward and the City Beautiful Movement

We have recently wrapped up our work digitizing the 1900 census for Harrisburg and are focusing on creating our Omeka exhibits. However, while we were still digitizing the census it was easy to notice a few connections to the City Beautiful Movement, and therefore to our Omeka exhibits. For example, some students have encountered the … Continue reading The Eighth Ward and the City Beautiful Movement

Mira Lloyd Dock and the Civic Club

According to their website, the Civic Club "is a service organization that supports and initiates community projects" and "build[s] a better and greater Harrisburg." The club was formed in the late 1800s as a way to increase good citizenship and social order. With an emphasis on improving and beautifying the city, the club played a … Continue reading Mira Lloyd Dock and the Civic Club

Making Discoveries

With the work of our City Social projects finally finished, our focus now centers on our City Beautiful projects. This past week we spent a significant amount of time at the Dauphin County Historical Society (DCHS) and the Pennsylvania State Archives doing research on our respective topics. We have learned many things that are really interesting. Did … Continue reading Making Discoveries

Lessons from the Archives

One of my favorite parts of Messiah College’s Digital Harrisburg efforts has been the opportunity to explore local archives and delve headfirst into primary source research. As my fellow classmate Rachel pointed out in another Messiah College student-run blog, it truly is an unparalleled experience to have the original copy of a primary source sitting … Continue reading Lessons from the Archives

From Mayor to Chair

This past week, I have spent several hours at the Dauphin County Historical Society researching Vance McCormick. At the start of this research project, I did not know much about McCormick. From our class reading of City Contented, City Discontented, I knew McCormick was the Mayor of Harrisburg from 1902-1905, and one of the influential members of the … Continue reading From Mayor to Chair

What Can We Extrapolate?

For those that have been keeping up with our posts, you probably have noticed that we have finished entering census data. It has been an extremely tiring and exhaustive process for each of us in the class to digitize at least twenty sheets of census records. As we came to an end, there was a … Continue reading What Can We Extrapolate?

Excelling in Census Data

These past few weeks we have been hard at work taking census data from 1900 Harrisburg and putting it into Microsoft excel. This work was done with help from Ancestry, Dr. Pettegrew, patience, attention to detail, and numerous cups of coffee. Below, you will see one of the many sheets from the 1900 census. I … Continue reading Excelling in Census Data

Warren Manning

Warren Manning is not a very familiar name to everyone, let alone those that are reading our engagements in Digital History or those who aren't knowledgeable of the "City Beautiful Movement" in Harrisburg. Although that may be true, to those that are writing the history of this city,  he matters quite a bit. Warren Manning, a student … Continue reading Warren Manning

Visiting the Archives

This past weekend a group of Digital History students drove down to Daulphin County Historical Society to take a peak inside the archives. We took time out of our Sunday to begin research for our digital exhibits on the City Beautiful Movement in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Upon arriving, we noticed the connection Harrisburg still has to … Continue reading Visiting the Archives