Digital Harrisburg: Winter 2017 Update

It has been a long time since our last update on the work of the Digital Harrisburg Initiative, so long that visitors may have concluded this is a dead project. Our work in fact has continued on a number of fronts and has continued to expand in ways we could not have anticipated when we initiated these projects in … Continue reading Digital Harrisburg: Winter 2017 Update

#ThrowbackThursday 9/22/1916

At Digital Harrisburg, we are starting a new #ThrowbackThursday, where we examine an issue of the Harrisburg Telegram that came out exactly 100 years ago.     September 22, 1916 On this day in Harrisburg history, an open-air dance was held in Market Square during the celebrations for the Harrisburg’s First Merchants’ Uniform Fall Opening, … Continue reading #ThrowbackThursday 9/22/1916

Silhouettes and Passing Time

A city cannot function properly without the co-operation of its populace and, even so, it requires dedicated individuals to view it with a critical eye and decide where it requires improvement. Beyond that, it requires individuals who are willing to not only see these needs, but also to act upon them. Women committed to this … Continue reading Silhouettes and Passing Time

Looking Backward and Looking Forward

Sitting in the Midtown Scholar Bookstore in Harrisburg this afternoon, I was glad to find myself with a little time to reflect on this past semester in Digital History. It was strange to realize how much we had accomplished in terms of reading, learning techniques, and project research. Project 1 seemed to fly by as … Continue reading Looking Backward and Looking Forward

Harrisburg’s 1900 Population… In the Books

The past two weeks we’ve been getting lost in Harrisburg, 1900, as we continue to work on our second project, “City Social.” We learned how to effectively make use of Microsoft Access, as we explored the City Social Database, which is a record of the citizens of Harrisburg in 1900. This massive database includes a … Continue reading Harrisburg’s 1900 Population… In the Books

Digital Archaeology

As this semester progresses, I realize more and more how similar Digital History is to Historical Archaeology. Where one researcher is brushing dust off artifacts, another is pouring through archives and databases for their very own dusty material. The more time you spend digging around, the more information you can gather and the more you … Continue reading Digital Archaeology

Whether ’tis Nobler…

As I stood at Desk #1 in the Pennsylvania State Archives, tears welled up in my eyes. Maybe it was the fact that we had the privilege of blowing early 20th century dust off Harrisburg tax records or the fact that this same dust was deeply stuck in my eye; either way it was a … Continue reading Whether ’tis Nobler…

What’s Black and White and Read All Over?

On the morning of September 24th, our Digital History class took a field-trip to the State Archives, located in central Harrisburg. I had the opportunity to complete research in the archives during my internship this summer, but only worked with the microfilm collection, so it was a really neat experience to actually handle original documents … Continue reading What’s Black and White and Read All Over?

The First Greeks of Harrisburg

The Digital Harrisburg Working Group has made major strides in the last six weeks in entering, publicizing, and standardizing data related to the City Social Project. We have had major success especially in our ability to visualize data in GIS. At some point soon, we’ll give a general update of all the recent activities related … Continue reading The First Greeks of Harrisburg

Explore Harrisburg in 1900: An Interactive Map of Buildings and Population

The Digital Harrisburg working group is pleased to announce a beta version of an interactive map of Harrisburg in 1900/1901 hosted at ArcGIS Online. This map and the data it contains was developed as a collaboration between faculty and students at Messiah College and Harrisburg University of Science and Technology. The  Historical Society of Dauphin … Continue reading Explore Harrisburg in 1900: An Interactive Map of Buildings and Population